When you were born, what were the social expectations for a person of your identity? What are they now? Do you identify with a particular generation (e.g., baby boomers, millennials, Generation Z,)?

Assignment Question

Age and generational influences: When you were born, what were the social expectations for a person of your identity? What are they now? Do you identify with a particular generation (e.g., baby boomers, millennials, Generation Z,)? How have your values and worldview been shaped by the social movements of or influences on your generation (e.g., Black Lives Matter Movement, social media, economic downturn, university costs, climate change, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Coronavirus Pandemic)? What generational roles are core to your identity (e.g., aunt, father, adult child, grandparent)? How have these roles influenced your life? How have cultural influences shaped who you are, how you see yourself, and how clients see you? How do these influences affect your comfort level in certain groups and feelings about particular clients? What is the relationship between your visible identity and your self-identification, and how is this relationship influenced by your cultural context? What kinds of assumptions are clients likely to make about you based on your visible identity, your sociocultural context, and the information you choose to share about yourself? How might your areas of privilege affect your work (e.g., your clinical judgments, theoretical preferences, view of clients, beliefs about health care)? Answers: 1991, Social expectations as a kid do as you’re told. Never talk back to adults. If you talked back far enough you’d get smacked or spanked. Millennial